Anomalous Aerial Vehicle Crash & Debris Recovered in Wales, UK

One wintery morning a farmer wakes up in the early hours and walks down to check his fields. To his amazement what he finds is a large quantity of shiny metallic debris spread across several acres. The material looked like a mixture of crumpled tin-foil and jagged chunks of ‘shattered’ aluminium. Naturally, the farmer assumed that a plane had crashed and disintegrated promting him to immediately call the police. Local police informed a nearby Air Force base and a crash investigation team was dispatched to investigate the scene.

You would be forgiven for thinking that we are talking about the legendary alleged flying saucer crash at Roswell, New Mexico, in 1947. The case at hand is, in fact, a little known incident which occurred at Llanilar, near Aberystwyth, Wales.

The landowner, Eurwel Evans, accompanied the RAF (Royal Air Force) aircraft crash investigation team that arrived on-site as they explored the metallic debris scattered across four of his fields. The airmen told Mr Evans that the greenish-grey honeycombed metal did not originate from any known aircraft. The investigators also clarified that no planes had been reported lost. From the amount of debris on the ground it was inconceivable that a conventional aeroplane could have taken such a hit and then flown away.

Soon after the RAF team finished their inspection a number of uniformed and civilian attired personnel from the MOD (Ministry of Defence) arrived. The MOD was far more thorough than the air force investigators, initially setting up a cordon and then beginning the careful collection of the debris. The team removed every single piece of the material, which ranged from large chunks 6-foot across to tiny fragments. Eurwel described the scene as “something out of a James Bond movie”.

Crumpled aluminium-foil-like debris found scattered around the suspected UFO impact site. Image credit: Bruce Fenton

The Ministry of Defence investigation gave only one statement on the case, two weeks later, in which they said that the material had not been identified and that no RAF or private aircraft had been lost in the area. The MOD also clarified that no craft had been detected in the area on any radar.

Despite the incredible nature of this event, and the astonishing overlaps with the Roswell incident it never became famous. The crash of the anomalous aerial vehicle found its way into only two newspapers, the Western Daily Advertiser and The Sunday Express, the latter ran a story titled ‘Strange debris out of the sky’ on January 23rd, 1983.

Honeycombed metallic material from the 'Welsh Roswell' UFO crash
Strange honeycombed metal alloy recovered from the ‘Welsh Roswell’ UFO incident (1984). Image credit: Bruce Fenton

By a twist of luck, a dedicated UFO researcher based in North Wales, Gary Rowe, read the article in the Express. He immediately got a team of investigators organised and headed down to Llanilar. With the permission of the farmer, Mr Evans, the ufologists scoured the fields for any signs of the strange material. It appeared the MOD had done an excellent job of recovering the debris, not a scrap could be found.

The team of researchers then noticed that the tops of some of the trees in a nearby copse had been broken, they turned their attention to that area instead. This would prove to be a fortunate decision as they subsequently found quite a number of pieces of the honeycombed metallic debris.

Large piece of honeycomb-patterned curved material conducive with originating from a saucer craft. Image credit: Bruce Fenton

Gary Rowe would later send samples off for testing with a professional metallurgist. The results were intriguing, the metal could not be accurately identified but was an alloy very much alike to duralumin. Duralumin itself is a lightweight metal, a form of aluminium, that is used in the manufacture of aircraft. There appeared to be nothing identical to the material known anywhere on Earth, duralumin was the closest match. The green vinyl-like coating covering the metal’s surface could not be identified.

The patterned ‘paint’ surface covering the UFO debris composed from an unidentified compound. Image credit: Bruce Fenton

Rowe planned to follow up with a second expedition to the copse of trees but was informed by Mr Evans that the forestry commission was cutting them down and taking everything away. Apparently even the soil was being scooped up for transport. Rowe made enquiries to the Forestry Commission, asking why a body dedicated to preserving forests would be destroying woodland. He was told that the activity was due to storm damage. He pressed the matter, asking whether it was normal to do something like this because of storm damage. The man on the other end of the phone call just sniggered and told him it wasn’t normal, but that was what he had been instructed to say!

It perhaps will come as no surprise to learn that Gary Rowe reports he was later visited by mysterious men in suits who requested that he turn over all materials his team had recovered. Mr Rowe informed the men that he had already distributed dozens of fragments between his contacts across the UK.

UFO debris fragment in one of the distributed key-rings. Image credit: Bruce Fenton

Rowe has given instructions that should anything happen to him or his recovered debris all of these people should contact the media and use their pieces as evidence of what had happened. That was the last he saw of the men in suits, though he claims his post was intercepted and opened for many weeks afterwards.

The UFO incident at Llanilar is potentially the most important event of its kind, it has all the elements of the Roswell case but with one important difference – we still have the physical debris available for study!

The UFO debris is exhibited and discussed in this video interview of Gary Rowe conducted by SUFON (South Wales UFO Network). Segment starts at 58:45. http://www.sufon.co.uk/

Important notice: For safety reasons Gary Rowe does not store the anomalous debris at his home at any time, it is kept in a secure facility with a number of measure in place to ensure that it is not stolen.

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